Manjung, a place of good food, great fun and fantastic view 1 million visitors every year

PCCCI, Manjung Branch
Home / Associations / Manjung, a place of good food, great fun and fantastic view 1 million visitors every year

A seaside village is where a visitor can let go of the anxiety and frustration of the big city, and cleanse the grime and dirt of mundane life off the body and soul.

Marina Island Pangkor, other beaches in Manjung which are popular among locals and tourists.
Marina Island Pangkor, other beaches in Manjung which are popular among locals and tourists.

In Manjung district, the beaches of Pangkor Island, Lumut, Teluk Senangin, Segari Pasir Panjang not only attract millions of tourists and nature lovers every year, but are also natural breeding ground for sea turtles. The Segari Turtle Sanctuary is a perfect place to observe egg laying, hatching and growth of sea turtles, as well as learning about the whole related food chain.

Pasir Panjang Tua Pek Kong Temple invested more then RM20 million to build several structures around the temple, including the tallest cctagonal pavilion in Malaysia, more than 280 statues of deities, Buddha and historical figures, a 30m statue of the God of Prosperity as well as an orphanage. This will create revenue for the management of the temple to pay for administrative expenses and operation of the orphanage. Tourists can also find out more about the lives of orphans here.

Lumut and Pangkor have attracted more than 1 million foreign and domestic tourists every year. The dried anchovies of Pangkor, processed seafood and other special local products are popular purchases among visitors and tourists.

 

Traditional handmade vermicelli

Sitiawan Fuzhou “Misua” (vermicelli) is a popular souvenir for visitors to Lumut and Pangkor Island. Although also produced in mechanized factories, most visitors still prefer the traditional handmade version.

Many people who have tastee the “red lees misua” at local Fuzhou restaurants would buy packs of dried “misua” as proof of their visits to Little Fuzhou. Another favorite among Chinese tourists, both domestic and overseas, is the Fuzhou plain biscuit, which many tourists will sample if they make a stop at Sitiawan.

The number of biscuit shops in Sitiawan and Kampong Koh has multiplied quickly given the rapid expansion in trade and tourism in Manjung. Yet, there are still long queues in front of these shops, and if you happen to encounter a busload of tourists, there is a strong possibility that you may have to leave empty-handed!

The production method of plain biscuits, traditionally made by bakers pasting the doughs one by one onto the inner wall of a big heated urn, might need to be improved in order to meet the rising demand of the market.

Kampong Koh Chili Sauce has also evolved from a family production to a popular purchase by visitors, either as gift or for own consumption, as the tourism industry expands.

Currently the production of chili sauce has evolved from manual production to automated production. The production process would go through high temperature sterilization to meet the hygiene requirements of the government. The production process has also become a not-to-be-missed itinerary for tourists. Many tour groups would bring busloads of visitors to Sitiawan and Pangkor to visit the factories, take photographs and buy the chili sauce.

 

The earliest bird’s nest production area in Malaysia

eng19003

Lumut and Pangkor have attracted more than 1 million foreign and domestic tourist every year.
Lumut and Pangkor have attracted more than 1 million foreign and domestic tourist every year.

Bird’s nest is another product waiting to be developed on full commercial scale. Sitiawan is the earliest place in Malaysia to begin building bird houses. There are currently more than 5000 bird houses in the district. With a high monthly output, bird’s nest presents an excellent business opportunity if they can be systematically developed into value-added products such as beauty supplements, cuisines or even tourists attractions.

The world-famous seafood processing plant in Lumut began its operation in the 1970s when small fishes which would have been thrown away was processed into products such as satay fish. As visitors to Pangkor Island bring back these products to their countries, they have become known throughout the world. To meet the escalating market demands, Lumut also produces processed shrimp, calamari and other seafoods.

The seafood processing industry has expanded in tandem with the growth of tourism and commercial activities in Lumut, from the initial family operations to large scale, hygienic, mechanized production for exports to overseas markets.